Just Five Things: Best book marketing blogs

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number-5Just Five Things, a list of simple actions that can enhance your publishing career. One tip for each day of the week related to every aspect of publishing from time management to marketing to writing.

1.  BookMarketingBuzzBlog / Brian Feinblum

2.  The Creative Penn / Joanna Penn

3.  Savvy Book Marketer / Dana Lynn Smith

4.  Author Marketing Experts / Penny Sansevieri

5.  SMART Marketing for Authors / Chris Syme

See you next week for another list of Just Five Things.

If you have a tip to share or need help with a challenge, email me at myauthorconcierge@gmail.com.

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Just Five Things: Characteristics of credible, effective publishing industry influencers

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five-706893_960_720Just Five Things, a list of simple actions that can enhance your publishing career. One tip for each day of the week related to every aspect of publishing from time management to marketing to writing.

Influencers – Individuals who have the power to affect purchase decisions of others because of their (real or perceived) authority, knowledge, position, or relationship. (Definition per Business Dictionary)

1. They are actively engaged on social media (consistently post content and have a high level of interaction with their audience).

2. They are widely recognized within the publishing community as an expert or authority.

3. They have a genuine passion for books, publishing, reading and authors.

4. Their audience has an authentic interest in you and your product (books).

5. They support positive experiences and authentic relationships, meaning they are respectful, professional, reliable and honest.

See you next week for another list of Just Five Things.

If you have a tip to share or need help with a challenge, email me at myauthorconcierge@gmail.com.

Just Five Things: How to network with publishing professionals

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5Just Five Things, a list of simple actions that can enhance your publishing career. One tip for each day of the week related to every aspect of publishing from time management to marketing to writing.

1.  Networking is about building authentic professional relationships so be prepared to offer solutions and benefits to others. “True networking occurs when there’s an understanding that everyone in the room has equal value. In its purest form, it’s about people enjoying other people, communicating passions and connecting with others who share those passions.” — Andrew Vest, How to Network the Right Way: Eight Tips

2.  Practice your networking skills prior to formal events. Read How to Network: 12 Tips for Shy People by Meridith Levinson, who offers these practical suggestions: Smile. Ask a question. Listen.

Bonus tip: Memorize 3-5 icebreakers to start conversations with strangers. Here are a few suggestions.

Hi, my name is ____.
What’s been your favorite workshop so far?
Tell me about yourself.
What do you write?
What are you currently working on?
What are you most looking forward to during this event?
Do you have any tips or suggestions for a first timer?
How did you get started in publishing?
I’m a fan of your books/company/work.
What advice would you give someone just starting out in publishing?
Who are you here to meet?
Who do you know here?

3.  Be prepared to share information. Have business cards and/or bookmarks/postcards. Refine your “elevator pitch” about your book(s) and about your author brand/career.

4.  Many networking events include social activities, but remember these are professional settings. Do not reveal inappropriate personal information, do not drink to excess, do not overstep personal boundaries.

5.  Sometimes interacting with “important people” is intimidating, but don’t let this cause you to miss valuable opportunities to connect. In 3 Tips for Making Conversation with Really, Really Important People, Lily Herman suggests treating them like real people, finding personal connections to springboard conversation (“I see you like cats. I have a Siamese named Oscar.”), and making sure to follow up.

See you next week for another list of Just Five Things.

If you have a tip to share or need help with a challenge, email me at myauthorconcierge@gmail.com.

Just Five Things: Coping with negative reviews

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5Just Five Things, a list of simple actions that can enhance your publishing career. One tip for each day of the week related to every aspect of publishing from time management to marketing to writing.

1.   Check out reviews for your favorite author to affirm that all authors gets negative reviews.

2.  Avoid reading reviews, especially if you aren’t thick-skinned.

3.  Have someone else monitor reviews in case something requires attention.

4.  Print and post positive reviews as a reminder that readers like your books.

5.  Try to be objective about negative reviews. Are there valid points that could lead to improvement in your books or storytelling?

See you next week for another list of Just Five Things.

If you have a tip to share or need help with a challenge, email me at myauthorconcierge@gmail.com.

Publishing predictions for 2016

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The experts are weighing in on what trends and changes they expect to see in publishing in 2016. Listed below are a few highlights. What do you predict will happen in book publishing over the next 12 months?

Jonathon Sturgeon, Flavorwire, predicts:

Increase in co-authored books.

Proliferation of “adult relaxation” books (AKA coloring books)

Billionaire erotica out; “prole erotica” in

Mark Coker, Smashwords, predicts:

Indie authors will edge into large publishers’ market share

Many full-time indie authors will quit or minimize production

Increase in use of pre-order option to boost sales

Publishing Technology predicts:

Fastest growth segments will be audio and children’s publishing

Ebook and print will diverge into parallel markets

Publishers will cut mid-list authors

Tom Chalmers, blogger on Digital Book World, predicts:

Increased focus on foreign sales

Growth of print sales

Evolution of book fairs and micro-fairs

Alexandra Alter, The New York Times, looks back at 2015:

Audiobook sales rose

There was no single breakout novel in lit fiction

POV is enough to re-do an old favorite

 

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